Infrastructure Fund projects

From 2022 to 2025, UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) is investing a total of £481 million into a portfolio of research and innovation infrastructure investments to maintain the UK’s position as a research and innovation superpower.

The funding will power ground-breaking research, across a spectrum of disciplines that will help to tackle a range of societal issues, from the impacts of climate change to adolescent mental health.

Funded through UKRI’s Infrastructure Fund, the projects, located across the UK, will strengthen international capability and transform expertise across the arts, physics, life and environmental science, social science, medicine and many more research areas.

Details of Infrastructure Fund Portfolio

Full Infrastructure Projects

Adolescent Health Study: a step change for adolescence research

Funding

£9.7 million over the next three years. £61.9 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2023 to 2024.

About the project

The Adolescent Health Study is a unique study that will follow over 100,000 adolescents (eight to 18 years of age), gathering data about their health and lifestyle for a minimum of 10 years.

It will provide unparalleled biological and real-time lifestyle data during a key life period of rapid mental and physical development and explore the health of adolescents in the 2020s and in a post-COVID-19 world.

Data will be gathered through modern innovative sampling methods. Biological samples will be collected to create the world’s largest collection of hormonal and inflammatory markers in this key age group.

Investment in this study will give the UK science community a competitive advantage in understanding critical population trajectories and prevention of health and social problems that have their roots in early life or adolescence.

Funding is subject to business case approvals.

BioFAIR

Funding

£6.3 million over the next three years. Total Infrastructure Fund investment for future funding years to be confirmed.

Project start date: financial year 2024 to 2025.

About the project

BioFAIR is a virtual infrastructure for biological and biomedical sciences. It will enhance the sharing, management, and reuse of life sciences data by assembling, hosting, and operating a coherent set of registries, repositories, data management and analysis services for UK users.

The result will be improved availability and usability of data currently scattered across repositories by bridging the gap between researchers, institutional data repositories, and existing data infrastructures.

The ability to manage and access large amounts of data in a consistent and accessible format will accelerate discovery and enable a real step change for many fields of life sciences, ranging from synthetic biology and industrial biotechnology to plant sciences.

CoSTAR: a national infrastructure for creative research and innovation

Funding

£24.2 million over the next three years. £69.3 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2022 to 2023.

About the project

CoSTAR is a new creative facility for the UK’s renowned screen, gaming and performance sectors.

The state of the art facility will support fast-growing creative industries to develop new products and experiences.

It will comprise a central hub and experimental studio fitted with real-time digital technologies such as motion and volumetric capture. These, and other advanced technologies, will allow the viewer to rotate or move around in what appears to be a three-dimensional space.

The central hub will be enhanced by a network of regional labs across the UK.

Funding is subject to business case approvals.

Diamond-II

Funding

£81.5 million over the next three years. £296.6 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2022 to 2023.

About the project

Diamond Light Source is the UK’s national synchrotron, funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) and the Wellcome Trust. It is located at STFC’s Rutherford Appleton Laboratory on the Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire.

It harnesses the power of electrons to produce an intense beam of light that can be used like a giant microscope.

Diamond II will deploy a transformative new technology to provide a 70-fold improvement in the brightness of its light beams.

This will open up wholly new insights into materials research, as well as increasing throughput to accelerate materials discovery or drug development. In addition, it will offer real-time insights into processes such as advanced manufacturing and the performance of next-generation batteries.

This project is linked to the Diamond II scoping study, and funding is subject to business case approvals.

DigitalFootprints

Funding

£5.3 million over the next three years. £49.3 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2023 to 2024.

About the project

People’s interactions with the world and each other are increasingly digital.

DigitalFootprints will be a transformative infrastructure enabling and accelerating the creation, access, and analysis of digital footprint data including:

  • internet and social media
  • geospatial
  • commercial and transactional
  • sensor and image data.

The research will address national challenges, such as:

  • the implications of our online lives
  • building back stronger, productivity, growth and prosperity
  • net zero
  • changing populations, transport and mobility.

DigitalFootprints will support pressing research and policy questions in the social sciences raised by a post-COVID-19 society facing challenge and opportunity and will help deliver the government’s National Data Strategy.

Funding is subject to business case approvals.

Early Life Cohort: a next generation longitudinal data infrastructure for the UK

Funding

£0.6 million over the next three years. £28 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2024 to 2025.

About the project

The UK is renowned for its world-leading birth cohort studies, stretching back to the 1940s. The new Early Life Cohort (ELC) will understand the generation of children being born in a distinctly different, post-COVID-19 era, setting the foundation for studying its life-long consequences.

The ELC will follow children and their families across all aspects of their everyday lives from soon after birth.

This novel data infrastructure will transform our understanding of UK society and will provide answers to questions around the impact of the following factors on children’s experiences and outcomes:

  • inequalities
  • environment
  • social media.

Funding is subject to business case approvals.

EMBL-EBI: Data Resources for the Life Sciences Phase 2

Funding

£12.4 million over the next three years. £80.7 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2024 to 2025.

About the project

The European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), part of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), is home to the world’s most comprehensive range of freely available biological data stores, analysis tools and dissemination resources.

With the volume and diversity of data deposited continuing to grow rapidly, this investment is required to transform EMBL-EBI’s current capacity. It will also support the development of new data platforms and portals to address global priorities, such as:

  • antimicrobial resistance
  • sustainable agriculture
  • biodiversity loss.

Funding is subject to business case approvals.

Endeavour: next generation capability for the ISIS Neutron and Muon Source

Funding

£3.4 million over the next three years. £73.5 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2023 to 2024.

About the project

Endeavour will provide new instruments and significant upgrades of several others at STFC’s ISIS, a national multidisciplinary facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory on the Harwell Campus in Oxfordshire.

ISIS uses pulses of particles called neutrons and muons to study the structure and dynamics of materials on an atomic scale.

The Endeavour instruments will further ISIS’ international scope, attracting global talent and encouraging further international investment.

Endeavour will enable research in areas such as:

  • materials for the future
  • smart material
  • flexible and clean energy technologies
  • advanced manufacturing
  • biosciences and healthcare.

Funding is subject to business case approvals.

Floods and Droughts Research Infrastructure (FDRI)

Funding

£13 million over the next three years. £38 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2023 to 2024.

About the project

The Floods and Droughts Research Infrastructure will be a world-leading observation network and sensor innovation test bed to mitigate the impacts of floods and droughts in the UK.

This ‘hub and spoke’ infrastructure will deliver the first UK-wide, catchment-scale monitoring facility. It will provide observations at scales previously not possible to reduce uncertainty in key hydrological processes.

FDRI will enhance scientific understanding of hydrological processes to help meet the demands of adapting to a changing climate.

This will improve the UK’s resilience to extreme hydrological events and support the development of tools to underpin evidence-based policy and decision making.

Funding is subject to business case approvals.

HiLUX

Funding

8.6 million over the next three years. £17.2 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2023 to 2024.

About the project

HiLUX is a major upgrade of the ultrafast laser and infrared spectrometer infrastructure at STFC’s Central Laser Facility, located at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory on the Harwell Campus in Oxfordshire.

This investment will extend the range of the UK’s suite of resources for ultrafast spectroscopy. This is a technique that uses sequences of ultrashort light pulses to study processes in atoms, molecules, or materials that occur in millionths of a billionth of a second or faster.

Taking advantage of recent developments in advanced laser, detector, and computational technology, HiLUX offers a unique opportunity for UK research and industry communities to move beyond the current limit of existing technology. It could greatly reduce timescales to results in the disciplines of:

  • photovoltaics
  • batteries
  • fuel cells
  • catalysis
  • energy-efficient electronics
  • drug design
  • development and screening
  • artwork preservation.

Hyper-Kamiokande

Funding

£6.2 million over the next three years. Total Infrastructure Fund investment for future funding years to be confirmed.

Project start date: financial year 2021 to 2022.

About the project

Being constructed 650 metres underground in Japan, Hyper-K is an international science experiment to unlock the mysteries of the Universe’s evolution.

It is both a microscope for measuring the properties of neutrinos and a telescope for observing the sun and supernovas.

John Innes Centre and The Sainsbury Laboratory Next Generation Infrastructure

Funding

£54.7 million over the next three years. £317.7 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2021 to 2022.

About the project

The John Innes Centre and The Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich are internationally recognised centres of excellence in plant and microbial science.

This investment will transform the existing capabilities of both centres via new and shared interdisciplinary research facilities with a goal for the facility to be net zero.

Integrating these capabilities will address research challenges including:

  • genetic crop improvement strategies
  • reducing greenhouse gas emissions through soil health
  • understanding plant-microbe interactions to develop clinical treatments to improve human health.

Funding is subject to business case approvals.

Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) 2030+

Funding

£1.1 million over the next three years. £49.4 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2024 to 2025.

About the project

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is the world’s largest and highest-energy particle collider, used to increase our understanding of matter and of the origins of the universe.

The Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment is set up to explore what happened after the Big Bang that allowed matter to survive and build the universe we inhabit today.

The LHCb 2030+ will be an upgrade to this world-leading facility. It will include a new experimental facility with major enhancements to its subdetectors that will allow a step change in precision for particle physics. This will provide opportunities for scientific discoveries for at least the next 20 years.

Funding is subject to business case approvals.

National facility for ultra-high field (11.7T) human MRI scanning

Funding

£15 million over the next three years. £29.1 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2023 to 2024.

About the project

The national facility for ultra-high field human MRI scanning will provide the research community with the highest performance MRI scanning technology currently available.

This will drive new insights into brain functionality and the mechanisms of human disease.

This national facility, to be based at the University of Nottingham, will provide the UK with a unique capability to understand and exploit ultra-high field human MRI scanning technologies.

In addition, it will enable new research into fields such as neuroscience that could not have been achieved using existing technologies.

Funding is subject to business case approvals.

1.2 GHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectrometer

Funding

£16.1 million over the next three years. £17.6 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2021 to 2022.

About the project

The ultra-high field 1.2 GHz NMR system will provide our researchers and industrialists with access to the highest performance available in NMR globally, both in terms of sensitivity and resolution.

This will be for use by UK researchers and businesses across the physical and life-sciences to study molecules to improve the design of new drugs and materials and design new forms of clean energy.

Population Research UK (PRUK)

Funding

£5.4 million over the next three years. £9 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2021 to 2022.

About the project

The UK has a world-leading population study portfolio studying individuals over their lives, spanning more than 70 years.

The investment in PRUK will transform the impact of this data by developing digital tools to integrate the UKs longitudinal datasets with other health and administrative information.

The result will be an acceleration of multidisciplinary population research that could provide insight into profound socioeconomic and health challenges, such as:

  • rebuilding from recession
  • understanding pandemics such as COVID-19
  • capturing changing social attitudes and lifestyles.

Research Infrastructure for Conservation and Heritage Science (RICHeS)

Funding

£15.8 million over the next three years. £59.5 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2024 to 2025.

About the project

RICHeS will be a network of facilities and expertise in the interdisciplinary field of heritage science.

It will create clusters of excellence, unlocking the potential for heritage assets to contribute to innovation in areas such as:

  • digital twins
  • artificial intelligence
  • robotics
  • bioimaging.

As a ‘hub and spoke’ infrastructure, it brings together over 50 UK heritage organisations and provides them with access to state of the art infrastructure to analyse, digitise and archive our national treasures.

By creating an ecosystem in which multidisciplinary research and innovation can happen at scale, RICHeS will drive innovation both in the preservation and understanding of heritage and beyond.

Funding is subject to business case approvals.

Simons Observatory (SO:UK)

Funding

£12.6 million over the next three years. £18.3 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2022 to 2023.

About the project

SO:UK is an array of three telescopes designed to perform very precise observations of the cosmic microwave background, electromagnetic radiation which is a remnant from the big bang.

Operating from Chile as part of the US-led Simons Observatory (SO), SO:UK will be a major upgrade to an existing international observatory.

It will search for primordial gravitational waves and address central questions in fundamental physics, such as:

  • early behaviour of dark energy
  • the formation of intergalactic clusters and galaxies.

This investment supports a new US-UK collaboration in a high profile area of fundamental physics.

It will secure the UK as a major partner in an international project.

The Square Kilometre Array Observatory (SKAO)

Funding

£33.2 million over the next three years. £66.7 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2021 to 2022.

About the project

The SKAO’s telescopes, based in South Africa and Australia, will be the world’s largest radio telescope and the largest scientific instrument on the planet once construction is complete.

The telescopes will investigate the development of the early universe in more detail than ever before and will have the broadest science range of any previous facility. Some of the main SKAO science drivers include:

  • galaxy evolution, cosmology and dark energy
  • the cradle of life
  • cosmic dawn.

With SKAO headquarters at Jodrell Bank in Cheshire, this investment will cement the UK’s role as host and contribute to the construction phase of the telescopes.

Total Body PET platform

Funding

£9.7 million over the next three years. £32.1 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2024 to 2025.

About the project

Positron emission tomography (PET) is a non-invasive imaging technique that may detect the early onset of diseases before other imaging tests can.

This new total body PET scanner, with two new state of the art facilities and associated radiochemistry centres, will represent the first head to toe PET infrastructure in Europe.

This will be underpinned by an advanced data management platform to facilitate sharing of PET images across academic and industry communities, managed by a team based in the Medicines Discovery Catapult in Cheshire.

This new PET technology is 40 times more sensitive and has a faster scan time, enabling three times as many scans per day and significantly decreased radiation exposure to patients.

Funding is subject to business case approvals.

UKRI Airborne Laboratory

Funding

£37 million over the next three years. £49 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2021 to 2022.

About the project

The UK’s Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) is a flying laboratory that enables scientists to track and evaluate:

  • pollution
  • severe weather
  • the effects of climate change.

The aircraft analyses the atmosphere and monitors air pollution levels over UK and international skies. It has:

  • tracked dangerous gases caused by volcanic eruptions
  • surveyed drought in Africa.

This investment will upgrade the aircraft’s scientific equipment which will continue to support environmental scientists for the next 18 years.

UK Biobank Phase 2

Funding

£29 million over the next three years. £127.6 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2023 to 2024.

About the project

UK Biobank is one of the most important resources for population health in the world. This vast biomedical database collects genetic and health data from half a million individuals in the UK who have been followed for 10 years.

UK Biobank Phase 2 will replace the outdated infrastructure with faster, higher capacity and lower energy sample storage to significantly accelerate health discovery science.

This upgrade, located in Manchester, will:

  • enable Biobank to meet the rising demand from UK and international researchers
  • build on existing relationships with global pharma and data science companies
  • continue to attract industry investment.

Funding is subject to business case approvals.

Vulcan 2020: Science in Extremes

Funding

£19.8 million over the next three years. £59.7 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2023 to 2024.

About the project

Vulcan 2020, based at STFC’s Central Laser Facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory at the Harwell Campus in Oxfordshire, will be the highest power civilian laser in the world. 10 times more energy, 20 times more powerful and 100 times more intense than any other laser of its kind.

Lasers are used by researchers for many applications, from understanding the stars in the universe to studying nuclear reactors.

The huge increase in power and intensity in Vulcan 2020 will allow researchers to observe the effects of core state chemistry for the first time and draws us closer to the secrets of the cosmos.

Funding is subject to business case approvals.

Scoping projects

Boulby Underground Laboratory: Dark Matter and Beyond scoping project

Funding

£2.8 million over the next three years. £2.8 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2022 to 2023.

About the project

Located in the north-east of England 1.1km underground, STFC’s Boulby Laboratory is one of the only laboratories in the world that can offer experimental space with vastly reduced levels of interference from natural background radiation and cosmic-ray particles.

This provides researchers with safe access to the unique deep underground geology and environment that can be used to advance scientific understanding across several disciplines including:

  • earth and environmental sciences
  • biosciences
  • astrobiology
  • planetary exploration studies.

The scoping project will consider whether Boulby could host a major international next-generation dark matter or neutrino detector post-2030.

Diamond-II scoping project

Funding

£2.8 million over the next three years. £5.3 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2021 to 2022.

About the project

Diamond Light Source is the UK’s national synchrotron, funded by STFC and the Wellcome Trust and located at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory at the Harwell Campus, Oxfordshire.

It harnesses the power of electrons to produce an intense beam of light that can be used like a giant microscope.

This scoping project will develop the technical design for a transformative upgrade of the synchrotron required to offer a 70-fold improvement in the brightness of the light, increasing performance through:

  • speed of observations
  • resolution of images
  • sensitivity of chemical analysis.

This scoping study will help to inform the major Diamond II infrastructure project.

Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) scoping project

Funding

£2.3 million over the next three years. £2.9 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2021 to 2022.

About the project

The EIC will be built at Brookhaven Lab in the United States. It will be a particle accelerator that collides electrons with protons and nuclei to look inside those particles and study their internal structure, to better understand the nature of matter.

This scoping project will position the UK to lead the future development of cutting-edge detector technologies for the EIC.

ISIS-II feasibility, design studies and research and development.

Funding

£3.9 million over the next three years. £5.1 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2021 to 2022.

About the project

The ISIS Neutron and Muon Source is based at the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, on the Harwell Campus in Oxfordshire.

It produces beams of neutrons and muons that allow scientists to study materials at the atomic level using a suite of instruments, often described as ‘super-microscopes’.

This scoping funding will enable feasibility and design studies on the proton driver and target system architecture required to develop a next generation neutron facility in decades to come.

Relativistic Ultrafast Electron Diffraction and Imaging (RUEDI) scoping project

Funding

£2.6 million over the next three years. £3 million cost from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2021 to 2022.

About the project

This funding will investigate the design of a new national facility for materials, the RUEDI centre, based at the STFC’s Daresbury Laboratory.

RUEDI will be a facility unique in the UK and globally, capable of observing how structural changes occur within different materials using electrons for diffraction patterns and images.

It will support advances in areas as diverse as:

  • personalised medicine
  • energy storage
  • clean growth
  • materials operating under extreme conditions.

CO2 Storage Laboratory: Phase 2 scoping project

Funding

£2 million over the next three years. £2 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2022 to 2023.

About the project

This is the second phase of a scoping study to develop plans for a facility to safely store CO2 deep underground on an industrial scale.

The study is looking at developing new technologies and equipment to improve monitoring, reduce costs and further enhance safe storage.

The facility will be located in an appropriate geological setting, for example in the north-east of England, and will position the UK as a global leader in clean growth.

Ion Therapy Research Facility scoping project

Funding

£2 million over the next three years, £2 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years

Project start date: financial year 2022 to 2023.

About the project

This scoping study will develop the specification and costs for a pioneering, national radiobiology facility intended to conduct the basic research needed to develop and apply the next generation of ion beams for radiotherapy.

Beams of positively-charged atoms such as carbon ions deposit their radiotherapeutic dose in quite different ways to the X-rays and protons presently available in the UK for cancer treatments; combined with new delivery methods, ions can potentially be used to treat tumours that are resistant to current techniques.

Combining developments in medical accelerator technology and sample delivery, this facility will help the UK be at the forefront of the research required for the next generation of radiotherapy treatment.

UK Plant and Crop Phenotyping Infrastructure scoping project

Funding

£2.4 million over the next three years, £2.4 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2022 to 2023.

About the project

This scoping study will address challenges of crop resilience and global food security through a national distributed infrastructure in plant and crop phenotyping.

This will take advantage of the diverse expertise, facilities and variety of field sites (with differing soil and environmental conditions) across the UK.

It will support the development of testbeds for trialling new crop varieties, including higher yield varieties, climate resistant varieties, and testing response to pathogens.

X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL): conceptual design and options analysis

Funding

£3.2 million over the next three years, £3.2 million from the Infrastructure Fund in total including future funding years.

Project start date: financial year 2022 to 2023.

About the project

This conceptual design study will explore different options to provide access to a second generation XFEL capability for UK science and innovation.

XFELs are large machines that produce coherent X-rays and can be used to study matter simultaneously on spatial and temporal scales.

Such capability allows for a wide range of cutting edge multidisciplinary applications across science and technology, for instance:

  • bioscience and healthcare: mapping atomic details of viruses and supporting drug discovery
  • net zero growth: providing new approaches for low-cost energy generation and storage technologies
  • technology: developing new and advanced materials with direct applicability to:
    • industry
    • mobility
    • digital manufacturing
    • nuclear energy
    • defence
  • fundamental science:offering new processes to study the interior of planets.

Completed scoping projects

CO2 Storage Testbed scoping project, £0.4 million

This scoping study developed options for a UK CO2 Storage Testbed. It aimed to de-risk subsurface CO2 storage and address research and innovation questions regarding the long-term operation and management of geological CO2 storage. It:

  • engaged widely with stakeholders to fully understand requirements
  • reviewed the national and international capability
  • proposed a science plan for a future national facility.

Floods and Droughts Resilience (FDR) scoping project, £0.3 million

This award funded a scoping project to investigate the requirements for a new national floods and droughts resilience infrastructure.

This infrastructure would provide a world-leading observation network and a sensor innovation testbed, enabling research that will contribute to the to mitigation impacts of flood and drought in the UK.

A consortium was led by:

  • the UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
  • British Geological Survey
  • Imperial College London
  • University of Bristol.

National Preclinical Phenotyping Platform (N3Ps) – Design Study, £2.2 million

The National Preclinical Phenotyping scoping project produced a design for a facility to enable efficient and effective preclinical trials that would be accessible by academia and industry.

Service Robotics Proving Ground scoping project, £0.5 million

This design study supported development of the Robotics Proving Ground, an internationally recognised facility in the UK that tests advanced robots to their limits against one of:

  • rigorous standardised performance evaluations
  • bespoke tests to meet specific customer needs
  • less structured experimentation.

The facility will be focused on advanced service robotics or ‘robots in the wild’. These navigate complex and often unstructured environments, including public spaces, rather than being manufacturing and assembly robotic arms already common in factories.

Research Infrastructure for Conservation and Heritage Science (RICHeS), £0.2 million

This award funded a scoping study and community engagement to explore options for a distributed Research Infrastructure for Conservation and Heritage Science (RICHeS).

Project funding status

In May 2022, the three-year £481 million investment, made from UKRI’s Infrastructure Fund, was confirmed by the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, Kwasi Kwarteng as part of UKRI’s detailed three-year budget allocation.

The full UKRI Infrastructure Fund investment in this portfolio is estimated to be £1.6 billion including subsequent years.

Given the high value of a number of these projects, many of the investments will be subject to business case and further approvals, which is standard practice to ensure the responsible use of public money.

Last updated: 21 July 2022

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